October 27, 2016 - 9:05am -- staubach.9

Food is the third greatest expense for the typical American household. Approximately 13% of the average budget is consumed by food. [1] Consequently, 12.7% of US households are food-insecure, 7.7% of those households classify as having low food security and 5% classify as having very low food security. Ohio ranks above the national average in food in-security. [2] Families and children struggling with food in-security often reach out to assistance programs.  This means that 16 million children, or one in five, receive food assistance nationwide.[3] According to the National Center for Children in Poverty, 50% of children under 6 and 41% of children 6 or older are classified as low income.[4]

It is important to ensure that youth have access to healthy food throughout their day. The Farm to School movement is an effort that exists to help ensure that all youth have access to healthy food that will help them reach their potential and find future success.  Youth spend much of their time in school so there has become a duty for schools to provide adequate facilities and instruments necessary to meet the social, emotional, educational, nutritional, and psychological needs of the students. 

School districts have done amazing work stepping up to the challenges of producing 21st century learners who are ready to take on a plethora of challenges that are yet to be seen or understood.  Ohio State University Extension has been an ally, helping school districts achieve these unforeseen challenges.  Through the SNAP-Ed and EFNEP programs, thousands of youth have received nutrition education annually.  Through the 4-H program thousands of children have experienced the power of self-directed exploration and project based learning.

On November 10, 2016 from 3:00PM-6:00PM, Ohio State University Extension in Hamilton County is holding the Southwest Ohio Farm to School Workshop at Pleasant Hill Academy (1350 North Bend Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45224).  Pleasant Hill is the site of the 4-H Agri-Science in the City program in Cincinnati.  The free event will be filled with opportunities to network, learn about procurement practices, brainstorm and identify opportunities to get involved in the growing Farm to School movement. 

For information visit: hamilton.osu.edu.

To register for the event visit: go.osu.edu/SWFARM2SCHOOL

 

Agenda:

 
3:00-3:15- Welcome and Introductions- Tony Staubach, Program Manager, 4-H Youth Development
3:15-3:30- Farm to School Across Ohio- Amy Fovargue, Program Coordinator, Farm to School
3:30-4:00- Department of Education and Procurement Policies- Elizabeth Solomon, Education Program Specialist
4:00-5:00- Breakout session
Room: TBD- Educators and Families
Room: TBD- Producers and Processors
Room: TBD- Administrators
5:00-5:30- Group Report Out
5:30-5:45- Next Steps and Local Effort Recognition- Tony Staubach, Program Manager, 4-H Youth Development
5:45-6:00- Closing and Thank you- Tony Staubach, Program Manager, 4-H Youth Development
 

By: Tony Staubach
Program Manager, 4-H Agri-Science in the City
Hamilton County
513-946-8986
Staubach.9@osu.edu



[1] (USDA, 2014)

[2] (Alisha Coleman-Jensen, 2016)

[3] (United States Census Bureau, 2015)

[4] (National Center for Children in Poverty, 2016)